Uh.......

What in the world is going on?
Post Reply
User avatar
hester_prynne
Posts: 2363
Joined: June 26th, 2006, 12:35 am
Location: Seattle, Washington
Contact:

Uh.......

Post by hester_prynne » May 7th, 2010, 10:25 pm

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/onfWHkNshFg&hl ... ram><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/onfWHkNshFg&hl ... fs=1&rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>
"I am a victim of society, and, an entertainer"........DW

User avatar
stilltrucking
Posts: 19963
Joined: October 24th, 2004, 12:29 pm
Location: Oz or somepace like Kansas

Post by stilltrucking » May 8th, 2010, 7:30 pm

I would like to be a pundit. Nobody remembers when you get it wrong.
The Trends Research Institute, forecasts that Senator John Kerry will handily win the White House. Gerald Celente, Founder of the Institute and publisher of the Trends Journal said,
http://archives.econ.utah.edu/archives/ ... g00347.htm
For the what it is worth department.
I don't know what happened but I thought this was interesting.
“We have a market that responds in milliseconds, but the humans monitoring respond in minutes, and unfortunately billions of dollars of damage can occur in the meantime,” said James Angel, a professor of finance at the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University.

In recent years, what is known as high-frequency trading — rapid automated buying and selling — has taken off and now accounts for 50 to 75 percent of daily trading volume. At the same time, new electronic exchanges have taken over much of the volume that used to be handled by the New York Stock Exchange.

One official said they identified “a huge, anomalous, unexplained surge in selling, it looks like in Chicago,” about 2:45 p.m. The source remained unknown, but that jolt apparently set off trading based on computer algorithms, which in turn rippled across indexes and spiraled out of control.



http://dealbook.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/ ... ?src=busln

User avatar
stilltrucking
Posts: 19963
Joined: October 24th, 2004, 12:29 pm
Location: Oz or somepace like Kansas

Post by stilltrucking » May 8th, 2010, 8:53 pm

I can hardly wait till the markets open on Monday morning.

Maybe we should put "In God We Trust "on our money.

I would be interested in reading what Non Sum has to say about all this.

User avatar
Barry
Posts: 679
Joined: August 14th, 2008, 9:12 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Post by Barry » May 8th, 2010, 9:34 pm

My wife's step-father died in 2005. She and her two siblings were always told that this 3 million dollar property holding of his was their inheritance. Her mother has been telling us since then that 2011 is the date it will all come to fruition, the date the big payoff takes place. I will be advising my wife to put 80% of her money, at least, into gold. For the last ten thousand years or longer gold has maintained value, no matter what the fluctuations in other markets. Even if it all went to shit tomorrow, gold will continue to be valuable. That's just the way gold is. I like what this man has to say. It ain't about the short term, it's about the long term.

Peace,
Barry

Non Sum

Post by Non Sum » May 9th, 2010, 9:50 am

Everything pulses, and nobody is surprised when a low tide follows a high tide, or an inhalation comes on the heels of an exhalation. So, why is it that a crash/correction is such a big shock, a dramatic loss of faith moment, when it inevitably follows a bubble/market top??

If any of you believe that the stock market is going down, then what’s the problem? Get off your butt and make some downside money; buy some negative ETF’s like SDS (a double neg SPY). TWM (a double neg small caps) handed me some nice pocket change this past week.

Yes Barry, gold is the one currency that government printers can’t cheapen so easily. It has been very good to me the past few years. But, gold too has its ups and downs, and is always erratic as hell. Not an investment for the faint of heart. Nor is it an investment to hold for over long. Check it’s chart, and you’ll see its story. With any investment, one must keep an ear to the ground, and a readiness to change horses quickly.

When Bernard Baruch (noted investor, and advisor to F. Roosevelt) was asked, ‘what will the markets do?’ He answered: ‘They will fluctuate.’ Invest on that premise, and you too will be as rich as Baruch.

User avatar
mnaz
Posts: 7235
Joined: August 15th, 2004, 10:02 pm
Location: north of south

Post by mnaz » May 9th, 2010, 6:07 pm

yes, the wall street casino. big deal. yawn.

User avatar
Barry
Posts: 679
Joined: August 14th, 2008, 9:12 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Post by Barry » May 10th, 2010, 12:29 pm

Yes Barry, gold is the one currency that government printers can’t cheapen so easily. It has been very good to me the past few years. But, gold too has its ups and downs, and is always erratic as hell. Not an investment for the faint of heart. Nor is it an investment to hold for over long. Check it’s chart, and you’ll see its story. With any investment, one must keep an ear to the ground, and a readiness to change horses quickly.
But to reiterate, NS, I was speaking of investing not in the short term, for me in my lifetime, but for my children and their children in their lifetimes, in the long term. If my father's father, or his father, had passed down just a small handful of these, http://americanhistory.si.edu/collectio ... ubleea.htm say $100 worth, about what, a third to half a years salary for most men in those days?, they'd be worth dramatically more than that now in gold value alone, not to mention the collectible value. Yes, markets will always fluctuate in the short term, but gold has for thousands of years done nothing but trend upward in value.

Peace,
Barry

Non Sum

Post by Non Sum » May 13th, 2010, 12:00 pm

Barry: gold has for thousands of years done nothing but trend upward in value.

NS: What constitutes “value”?
‘Value’ is relative. Yes, currency is almost always cheapening, but an ounce of gold has bought one tailor made suit since ancient Rome. Ever been on a stopped train, and felt that you were moving when a moving train goes past? A glance at the station proves you’ve not moved. But with ‘value’ there are no stations (absolutes). All value motion is relative.

I honestly salute your wise intention to hold gold long term. But, it can be hard for ‘weak hands.’ A few years ago I lost 100k to gold’s correction. Sure, its more than back now, but you can see how holding volatile assets long term can be harder in fact than in theory.
Good luck, my friend,
NS (Nothing’s Sure)

User avatar
Barry
Posts: 679
Joined: August 14th, 2008, 9:12 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon

Post by Barry » May 16th, 2010, 12:45 am

an ounce of gold has bought one tailor made suit since ancient Rome
Is there a factual basis for this statement? Or is it merely your speculation? Your making a point? Did people really wear tailor-made suits in Ancient Rome?

Here's the point I was making that you missed: when the Stock Market (and all other markets) crashes, when all that worthless paper returns to its state of non-worth, gold will still be of value. After the Apocalypse, when I'm standing at the town-center marketplace trying to trade for goods for my family, gold will be a viable trading commodity. As will be coffee, sugar, honey, etc. It's just that gold has a much longer shelf-life. Those stock and bond certificates? Not even good for toilet paper.

Peace,
Barry
PS: In case it's not obvious to you, I didn't mean paper that says I own gold. I meant actual gold in my hands, socked away somewhere, safe from thieves and robbers.

Non Sum

Post by Non Sum » May 16th, 2010, 9:43 am

Barry: Is there a factual basis for this statement? Or is it merely your speculation?

NS: Certainly not mine; it is an old, well know, saw that (for all the extreme fluctuations in price) is historically verifiable. Here’s a sample elaboration from a quick Ask.com search:

”While the value of our printed money can be eroded at the stroke of a button. Gold over time has never lost its value. There is an oft spoken adage that in Roman times an ounce of gold would buy a Roman Soldier a fine suit of armour, that in Shakespeare's time an ounce of gold would buy you a good quality suit of clothes and today an Armani suit may cost you the same price as an ounce of gold. Because gold has behaved this way for thousands of years it is an excellent way to preserve wealth - gold is a store of value. During times where money was backed by gold there was little or no inflation over centuries”

B: Your making a point?

NS: The same point in my previous post, i.e. precious metals are good for ‘holding value’ over long periods of time, but not all that grand for what you suggested: “increasing value over long periods.”

B: Did people really wear tailor-made suits in Ancient Rome?

NS: Only if they weren’t within convenient chariot distance to a Walmart. Who would want an off-the-rack toga; I ask you?

B: After the Apocalypse, when I'm standing at the town-center marketplace trying to trade for goods for my family, gold will be a viable trading commodity.

NS: In that extreme a scenario gold would more likely make you a target for a mob. A gun would trump gold in a state of lawlessness.

mtmynd
Posts: 7575
Joined: August 15th, 2004, 8:54 pm
Location: El Paso

Post by mtmynd » May 19th, 2010, 4:32 pm

NS: In that extreme a scenario gold would more likely make you a target for a mob. A gun would trump gold in a state of lawlessness.

... a loaded gun, my friend... very important to have it loaded. ;)

how many people must die for the gold to remain your own?
_________________________________
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Allow not destiny to intrude upon Now

User avatar
stilltrucking
Posts: 19963
Joined: October 24th, 2004, 12:29 pm
Location: Oz or somepace like Kansas

Post by stilltrucking » May 21st, 2010, 9:18 am

Have you considered comic books?
This one recently sold for $1,000,750. Not a bad return on a ten cent investment. Comic books are not only a sound investment they also provide entertaining reading material while you are hunkered in your bunker..

Image



I don't know hester. He could be right.
I read an interesting article called A Woman For Our Times
It was about Cassandra
So many voices warning about the 9/11 attacks before it happened, the oil spill in the gulf, the shenanigans on wall street. All ignored. Because it is still a man's world I suppose. They don't listen to dumb chicks"who don't get it"

Probably not you cup of tea
but there is a country song with these lyrics

Well somebody told us Wall Street fell
But we were so poor that we couldn't tell
Cotton was short and the weeds were tall
But Mr. Roosevelt's a gonna save us all

Non Sum

Post by Non Sum » May 21st, 2010, 3:47 pm

It's hard as hell to figure what is going to be a lucrative collector's item in the distant future. There are plenty of collectors out there trying to predict, and most of them will be stuck with a basement/attic full of junk.

Notice the date (1938) on that comic. That would call for some 8 year old to buy a sealed copy, preserve it unread in mint condition, and then comes the easy part: (s)he just has to sit back until they are 80 years old and cash it in for their heirs. :?

User avatar
stilltrucking
Posts: 19963
Joined: October 24th, 2004, 12:29 pm
Location: Oz or somepace like Kansas

Post by stilltrucking » May 21st, 2010, 10:36 pm

I would rather have a good can opener.

Post Reply

Return to “Culture, Politics, Philosophy”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest