Sueños tupamaros/Psicodelianarkorrida

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Arcadia
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Sueños tupamaros/Psicodelianarkorrida

Post by Arcadia » April 22nd, 2010, 9:43 pm

de Xuan Pablo Gonzalez, bought by the hand of his author during last friday´s Feria del Libro Independiente in San Martín´s plaza. The Xuan thing made me smile, but reading the books I found it somehow as an integral part of the vision they make possible and share with the reader. Wild, tender, generous book-trip to the roots and beyond.

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stilltrucking
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Post by stilltrucking » April 23rd, 2010, 7:35 am

this one?

Not sure if that link will work south of the border.
I will try to find another if it don't.

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stilltrucking
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Post by stilltrucking » April 23rd, 2010, 7:41 am

That link was so wrong :oops:

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Arcadia
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Post by Arcadia » April 25th, 2010, 5:43 pm

laranja psicodelica? :) interesting link, gracias s-t!. And you don´t need to be embarassed!: my description of the books were not too precise and one of the covers is orange! :lol: :wink:

I googled Xuan Pablo Gonzalez some minutes ago and have found various entries, this one maybe is of your interest:

http://www.joseluisdibiase.com.ar/2008/ ... -gonzalez/

gracias for reading!

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still.trucking
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Post by still.trucking » July 22nd, 2010, 12:07 pm

I thought you might like to see this

Joyce’s Ulysses
in Argentine Literature

By Carlos Gamerro (1)

Translated by David Barnwell
Ulysses is probably the foreign novel which has had most influence on Argentinean narrative fiction. At times it seems to be as much ours as if it had been written in Argentina. And in a way it was. Ulysses was published in Paris in 1922, and its odyssey through Argentinean literature began, as might be expected, with Jorge Luis Borges. As early as 1925 Borges boldly claimed ‘I am the first explorer from the Hispanic world to make landfall on Joyce’s book’. A year earlier he had attempted what may very well have been the first Spanish version of the text, a translation, in a heavily Buenos Aires dialect, of the final part of Molly Bloom’s soliloquy.

In his article ‘El Ulises de Joyce’ (Joyce’s Ulysses), Borges said that he approached Ulysses with ‘the vague intensity exhibited by ancient travellers upon discovering a land new to their wandering surprise’. He was quick to anticipate the question inevitably asked of everyone who reads this endless novel: ‘Did you read it all?’ Borges replied that he had not, but that even so he knew what it was, just as one can know a city without having walked down every one of its streets. More than just a caprice, Borges’s response in fact represented a shrewd methodological statement: Ulysses should be read as one might walk through a city, making up an itinerary, sometimes retracing one’s steps on the same streets and completely ignoring others. Similarly, a writer cannot be influenced by all of Ulysses, but rather by one or other of its chapters, or one or other aspects of the book.
Long article the rest of it is here
"Natural selection, as it has operated in human history, favors not only the clever but the murderous." Barbara Ehrenreich

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